When photographing falling water you have two choices: to capture a moment frozen in which all the moving water is in full detail by using a fast shutter speed, or get a more moody shot by using a slower shutter speed, to capture the falling water in soft focus, almost like white candy floss. I tend to take multiple shots of the same scene to get the best possible reference for later studies. Bear in mind that a lot of the lights go white and the darks can go black, so it’s best to take two extra shots, one exposing the lights and also one for the darks.

Also, in order to get the complete view in the frame you may have to use a wide-angle setting and this presents you with the problem of distortion by compressing the scene. Overcome this by taking a few shots at a standard setting and paste the photos together to get a truer picture.

DEMONSTRATION High Water, Aysgarth Falls, Yorkshire Dales

MATERIALS

  • Canvas board
  • Atelier Interactive Acrylics: transparent yellow, Indian yellow, transparent perinone orange, trans red oxide, cerulean blue, phthalo blue, ultramarine, cobalt turquoise
  • 2B pencil
  • Sterling acrylic brushes: 8, 6, 4, 2 flats; 4, 2 rounds; 4, 6 riggers
  • Spray diffuser bottle