Outstanding anatomical artwork features in this year’s Nancy Rothwell Award winning entries

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Outstanding anatomical artwork features in this year’s Nancy Rothwell Award winning entries

The winning and highly commended pieces of art for this year’s Nancy Rothwell Award have been announced.

The winning and highly commended pieces of art for this year’s Nancy Rothwell Award have been announced, with an array of intricate anatomical drawings including a hummingbird in mid-flight, a boa constrictor and a swimming crocodile.

The Nancy Rothwell Award celebrates artwork that captures the intricacies of anatomy, and this year more than 800 pieces were submitted by young artists from across the globe.

Submitted entries spanned three age categories (7-11, 12-14 and 15-18), and were judged by a panel of biologists and illustrators.

The winner of the 7-11 category is Ji Yoon Park, aged 10 from Seoul Foreign School, South Korea, for her drawing of a hummingbird in flight using coloured markers and coloured pencils (see right).

The winner of the 12-14 category is Hazel Nah, aged 14 from St. Johnsbury Academy, Jeju, South Korea, for their drawing of an emerald tree boa using coloured markers and coloured pencil (see above below).

The winner of the 15-18 category is Shivani Dawson, aged 17 from The Tiffin Girls’ School, Kingston, for her depiction of a broad-snouted caiman crocodile in coloured pencils, white paint and watercolours (see below).

The winning artists from each category will receive drawing equipment, a certificate, £25 for themselves, and £100 for their school.

All the winners and highly commended entrants will also each be awarded a copy of The Field Guide to Drawing & Sketching Animals by Tim Pond.

Tim, an illustrator based at the Zoological Society of London and member of the judging panel, commented on the winners from the 7-11 and 12-14 category winners: 'Ji Yoon Park’s entry showed different viewpoints within the drawing, for example, showing the iridescence in the kingfisher’s feathers, elements of its wing structure, muscles and also adaptations such as its beak. The piece is a very full and thorough study with notes and beautifully done.

'Hazel Nah’s depiction of a boa is an absolutely stunning piece of illustration work – I can easily see it in a magazine or book. The quality of the artwork is incredible. There is a lot of detail; the reflection on the eye makes it look alive, the anatomy of the scales, and the repeating vertebrae on the inside.'

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