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Help with brushes please

Posted By landscapeart Last Month
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landscapeart
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I have tried all sorts of brushes to achieve the minute detail in my miniatures. I have even trimmed brushes with scissors. I am still not happy with the result. Should I use synthetics no.0 or bristles no.00 or what else with my acrylics? This one is painted on wood size 10x15cm.



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Pat
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RobertJones
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Try a size 0 or 00 golden synthetic, from Rosemary and Co.  I find though that if the brush is too small, it holds hardly any paint and a slightly bigger one is actually easier to manage very often.

But - I can't do miniatures: I'd need a magnifying glass, and there's not much pleasure to be had (for me, anyway) hunched over a small painting trying to see what I'm doing.  Magnification does sometimes help though, for very fine detail..... just more trouble than I ever feel like going to!

The virtue of synthetic brushes, to go back to where we were, is their flexibility; you don't want to use your best sables, because acrylic paint is very bad for them; but now and then, a very small bristle brush, with its extra stiffness, can be what you need; though I find one gets through them at quite a rate - they don't keep a point for long.

Have you tried the Ivory range from Rosemary, in the smaller sizes?  They have a firmer touch - and provided you can see what you're doing will enable you to place colour where you need it, and not wobble over the lines where you don't.  
landscapeart
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Thank you, Robert. We can always rely on getting sound advice from you. I´ll have to try your suggestions but like yourself I have found that the smaller the brush the less paint it holds (law of physics I suppose). That is why I have trimmed thicker brushes with scissors where the point gives me the fine line I´m looking for and the shortened bristles act as a reservoir.


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Pat
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alanbickley
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Yes I must agree about the R&Co brushes. But on occasions for detailed touches, I do use the Sceptre Gold round range and found these excellent.

On the odd occasion when I have had a go at trimming a brush down, it just hasn't been any good, I guess these crisp accurate points are all part of the initial manufacturing process.
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Yes, well trimming a brush may be OK for a very old one that's splayed all over the place (though obviously that'll never give you a fine line) but cutting into the hair damages the integrity of the brush: not so much if you're just cutting away from the point, but certainly if you attempt more major surgery.  Are Sceptre Gold all a mix of natural hair and synthetic?  I've seen their rather handsome 3/4" flat, which was made that way I think...  I'll investigate.   The search for the perfect brush will always go on, I suspect!
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Thanks Alan and Robert. I´ll keep your advice in mind next time I buy brushes.


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Pat
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alanbickley
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Thanks Pat, yes Robert they are a mix of sable and synthetic, more synthetic I would think as they feel stiffer.

I primarily buy them for my ink drawings, I prefer drawing with a brush instead of using pens as they give me a more interesting line.

When they are past their best, they are great for small passages of detail in my oil paintings - not that I particularly use much detail, but occasionally some is required.

Lovely miniature Pat, way out of my skill zone!


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