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Thickening Gel for modelling paste?

Posted By gold 2 Months Ago
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gold
Posted 2 Months Ago
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I recently bought some thickening gel for my paints, but I find it difficult to use, is it possible to use this gel for covering the painting surface before starting by mixing it with White acrylic paint? Would this make a suitable surface for painting on or might it crack later..... I have done a bit of an experiment with various surfaces which is still tacky right now but i'm wondering about long term effects?
SylviaEvans
Posted 2 Months Ago
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Look at instructions on packaging. No idea what thickening gel is. Gesso is what you need as a base on a canvas or a board for oil or acrylic. There are numerous u tube sites which are brilliant for searching for info.

Sylvia.
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2 Months Ago by SylviaEvans
gold
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There are not many instructions, only that you must not mix more than 25% with acrylic paint which is the mixture I have experimented with so far..... Gesso wont give me the textured effect i'm looking for, the idea is to make the surface look like an oil painting, I just don't want to be paying out for modelling paste when I may be able to use a product I have here already.
RobertJones
Posted 2 Months Ago
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There are various products available - gel thickener is one.  I doubt that most of them will crack, unless you apply them with too much water or medium (or for that matter too little).  

On the whole, though - I don't like any of them, or use them.   The answer to most questions about texture is just to use thicker, full-bodied paint.  So that'll be Daler=Rowney Cryla, rather than System 3, for example.  And apply with a painting knife.  

Alwyn Crawshaw did a video on this a long time ago - I forget what he used (and anyway he used it with moderation) but I think it was indeed gel thickener.  My advice would be - use thicker paint.
alanbickley
Posted 2 Months Ago
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I don't paint with acrylics all that often, but I do use W&N artists quality Finity. They are a superb consistently and I paint exactly in the same way that I do when using oils.

No gel or anything like that, just good quality brushes which is so important. With the exception of Robert, I doubt anyone would be able to tell the difference between my oils and acrylics at a distance!
RobertJones
Posted 2 Months Ago
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Ah ha - I shall be looking out for it now, Alan!

But I agree - acrylic paints have come on by huge bounds since I first started using them over 50 years ago; you can use all sorts of things to bulk them up - any of the acrylic paint suppliers' websites will offer you a whole range of products - but with acrylics and with oils, I believe the best results come from using pure paint; you can use PVA glue under acrylics, or even under oils if you want to, but I've never found any need to when the paint itself more than does the job.  

If, with acrylic paint, you take a painting knife and slabs of stiff, full-bodied paint, and glaze over it to your heart's content, you'll get fantastic results that I do not believe are readily achievable through any of the short-cuts that are so readily available, and I'd encourage you to use pure paint - just THICK paint - rather than seek chunky substrates  as a means of achieving textured effects.  Yes, you can achieve results using a basis of PVA glue, or solid applications of texture paste, but paint, in my view, is always better than pastes because it produces subtler results, and just as much texture, especially if you use a knife.  
gold
Posted 2 Months Ago
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Thank you all for your advice, Ido use Cryla paints which are lovely and thick but at the moment I am painting in washes, so I want to use the wash method with the thickly painted finish if you know what I mean....So I actually need the blank canvas to have the texture before I start to paint.....The mixture I made earlier dried flat so I may try adding more thickener and less paint, and if that fails i'll just have to buy some modelling paste....
alanbickley
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I'm not sure why you would want to paint the same canvas using two styles as in a thin wash plus thick! Thinly applied acrylics are generally used as a watercolour technique on paper. Perhaps you aren't thinking that thin! But you have an idea of the finished effect, I haven't a clue, but it's not inspiring me.

Sometimes we try and complicate things, I like to keep painting simple in the main, using traditional methods and sound painting techniques. But I'm never against experimental work so good luck and let us see how you progress with this.

Gesso applied thickly in the areas that you want texture is all you need, that's the correct material to use, and you can manufacturer your own pattern into this before it dries using a variety of tools and textures.

There are several things that you can add to thicken up gesso, talcum powder I think is one, Google this for more info, or Robert will probably know more on that as I've never made my own gesso. Something that I may research though and have a go.
gold
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Thanks, i'll try the powder in Gesso, that may work for me.....
Hedgehog
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I’m not sure what it is you want to achieve and I don’t paint in acrylic, however I do do make a textured surface for my oil paintings which would also be suitable for acrylics.

I use wooden boards for my paintings. Firstly I make sure the board is sealed with one or two coats of Gesso either straight out of the tin or thinned a little. I then add a coat of gesso mixed with artists quality texture paste (several manufacturers make something similar). I use about a 50/50 mix to create a random texture which suits my style, but you can experiment to create the texture you require.

I have tried talcum powder as a filler but I found the texture I bit flat for me.

Hope this helps.

Alan Morris
gold
Posted 2 Months Ago
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Thank you Alan, I will give that a go if I end up buying texture paste, I was hoping to use thickening gel as it's something I bought but haven't used yet.....but it doesn't seem to do anything for a textured surface, just another of those things you buy but wished you hadn't bothered...
Marjorie
Posted 2 Months Ago
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Not being an expert by any means ...thickening gel is for the paint, not the surface...isn't it?
RobertJones
Posted 2 Months Ago
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Thickening gel should be mixed with the paint, yes.  

There are texture pastes available - take a look at the Jackson's website, they have most of them; they can be laid on the support and painted over, if such is your wish.
gold
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Yes, thickening gel is for mixing with paint, I just wondered if it could be used in any other way as I wasn't happy with the result when used as it should be, and wondered if it could be use to put a texture on the painting surface, however, I tried this and it definitely doesn't work, I may get round to buying some from Jackson's as advised if other home made methods don't work.


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