watercolour palettes


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By AmandaBrett - 11 Years Ago
Is anybody else a collector of watercolour palettes? I could stock a shop. I have tried a butchers tray, Tom Lynch palette (from Cheap Joe's), Liz Deacon palette (from Ken Bromley), muffin tray, mixing palette with lid from SAA as used by David Bellamy, large folding 28 well aluminium box (widely available and cheap but badly made), similar in plastic (from Dick Blick) and even a expensive small paintbox by Craig Young which is well made but being solid brass is heavy and I found the four flaps fiddly and with not enough flat mixing areas for my style. My latest is the Holbein Professional 500 palette (from Charles Evans or Heaton Cooper) and I think I am now happy. The larger Holbein 1000 would be better but it seems to be no longer available hence my entry in Buy and Sell. Pity you can't try before you buy !
By Anonymous - 11 Years Ago
I know the feeling !!!

May be you could keep them and one day they will find their way in the Antique road show !!!!
By _Diane - 11 Years Ago
Ha! I had to laugh when I read this! I thought I was the only one! I was starting to get worried about myself--w/c palette fetish? Ha! So far, my first and still favourite is my palette that is actually intended for acrylics, but I use it for w/c. It is a stay-wet palette without the little sponge lining thing. It has lovely, large wells for squeezing out tube colours and lots of space for mixing washes. Even the lid can be used for mixing. I keep a small, damp cellulose sponge inside when I'm not using it, to keep the paint from drying out. The down side is that it is large and not convenient in the least for plein air work. I have yet to find the perfect palette for this, and this is where I have a collection like you. I too have a Charles Reid, a brass enameled, various plastic contraptions made in different parts of the world, and none come close to the qualities of the one I use in my studio. So, if anyone has recommendations? My preference is for a lightweight, folding palette of about 5"X12"(folded), with nice, deep mixing wells for washes.
By arcattBrody - 11 Years Ago
Guess we are all guilty of thinking there must be a better palette for whatever media we are using. Oil , no problem. Acrylics, well I have already commented on the rubbish quality of stay wet palettes. Yes, I too have a cupboard full watercolour palettes all of which seemed to be a good idea at the time. For the past couple of years, I have settled on one of the large folding aluminium 30 x 27.5 cm. from SAA and Jacksons and possibly others. The lid area is not divided into wells so is really useful. The painting kit that lives in the car has one of the cheap white plastic ones about 25.5 cm. long

A problem with all the paint finished ones and the shiny white plastic ones is that water and paint forms in globules. I have largely overcome this by rubbing with one of the slightly abraisive kitchen cleaners, including the small paint wells. This helps the tube paints to stay - particularly W & N Sepia which always cracks up into chippings! A tip for when these become discoloured, both metal and plastic, is to clean them all over with a uPVC cleaner - got mine from Screwfix. It is a solvent so take care and is useful for all manner of things including removing the sticky residue that is often left after removing labels.
By AmandaBrett - 11 Years Ago
Diane I think you are looking for the same as me. If you find a Holbein professional 1000 let me know
By _Diane - 11 Years Ago
Hi Gazebo. Yes, I'll let you know if I find it.
By _Diane - 11 Years Ago
Hi gazebo,
Don't know if you got my message that I found the Holbein 1000 at artxpress.com, a metal version, not plastic. Hope this helps! If you order it, let me know how you like it? Thanks!
By monique158 - 11 Years Ago
Art Xpress is fantastic! That's where I got both my Holbein palettes! I love them!
By monique158 - 11 Years Ago
Oh my gosh. I reread the first beginning of the original post. I could laugh. That sounds just like me. I have so many palettes and paint kits. And these are just the ones that I acquired since my divorce. I have a medium size box somewhere of all the paint boxes and palettes that I had during marriage. There are tons. I have two Holbeins, a plastic one that is my favorite for some reason, a huge porcelain palette that is just too pretty to use, 2 of the old fashioned unused Winsor and Newton boxes, Schmincke boxes, Kremer paintbox, 2 altoids boxes with 18 wells that I bought off ebay and filled myself, Winsor and Newton Cotman boxes (unused), Maimeri halfpan paintbox (unused), 3 boxes from Natural Pigments, and a few more I can't remember right now. Not only that, I ordered two of the brass paintboxes from Craig Young. My gosh!!! Now that I see all this written here, I need to go through everything and sort some stuff out.

I'm so glad to know there are other "collectors" out there.

Monique
By ruthy - 11 Years Ago
hope you don't mind me saying, but it sounds like a quest for the holy grail.
I've only been collecting paint palettes a short while and just had a sought out, and was shocked to find i've got about five...... :-D (side plate included) I think i'm addicted too shopping in craft shops as well, and seem to have a bottomless pile of sketch books. *-)
By monique158 - 11 Years Ago
Hello Ruthy,
I honestly hope the Craig Young boxes cure me of the quest to find another paint box. My daughter is 8 years old, and is already looking forward to the day I can pass one of the boxes to her-and I won't even have mine until October! :-D I think though, that the Craig Young watercolor boxes are what I have been searching for and only wished I had heard about them years ago when I first started painting.
I love craft shops! When we went to Hawaii, there wasn't just an art store. I had to go to the craft store/hardware store/art store to get some new stuff. I ended up buying a whole lot more that day than I had originally intended.
Sketchbooks...aaaaahhhhh....I love those too. And paper. And ink for fountain pens, and....I could go on for days. LOL
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
Hi Gazebo 1, do you or anbody else remember or even own for that matter the Frazer Price Pallete box, you would see quite a few ads in the painting mags, it was made from brass and had water holders and a water bottle plus flaps that folded out for mixing areas, very unusual, reminds me a bit like Windsor and Newton,s Feild box they have on sale now. I have only ever seen one up for sale but was a bit should i say well used! They looked very classy and up market but realy was not that exspensive considering? Just curious, i think i had the pallete bug thats been going around and am always on the look out for unusual paint boxes! Does any one know of a doctor who can cure you of this illness as its hurting me right in my wallet! Yours truly Harry.
By AmandaBrett - 11 Years Ago
HI Harry
Sorry do not know the Frazer Price box. But I am not buying any more because my three Holbein sizes 350, 500 and 1000 are just what I have been looking for. There are some comments in the Buy and Sell thread on palettes which may put you off metal ones but at my age I don't need a box to last 50 years. The Craig Young boxes are well made but the design didn't suit me.
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
Hi, Gazebo 1, i was,nt trying to sell this kind of box to you as they went out of production many years ago but just trying to make a light hearted conversation, As to the remarks made in the other thread you refer to was probaly from me, i used to work in the steel industry and the part i worked in was to do with the rust protection so had experiance in that part. I was only simply trying to put over that some of the paint boxes that are made today are not as well protected as they used to years ago, i was in no way putting anybody down for buying them in fact i to have a holbein box along with windsor + newton, a couple of reaves boxes and a box named a brodie and middleton which is about 80 years old, the white enamel had turned yellow and the ceramic pans were crumbling but there was not a speck of rust. If you look back it was me who put you on to the art supplier and i said then i was very tempted in buying the 1000 but i have far to many so i had to stop myself! I realy do like the holbein range as they are an exellent design even the new aliminium one they have bought out. I hope you did,nt think my coments were offensive in any way as they were not intended to be, every one has there own choises and so they should do and if i have offended you by my coments then i apoligise and wish you well and have much enjoyment in painting with you paint boxes, at the end of the day its the actual painting that realy matters. Kind regards and happy painting, Harry.
By AmandaBrett - 11 Years Ago
Hi Harry,
I always enjoy your informative comments and of course you are right, nothing is as well made as in the past. As I said the Craig Young is very well made and will last a lifetime but I found the flat areas too small for my big brush style hence the Holbein 1000. I am glad my starting this thread has generated so much comment. Keep them coming. Regards Alan
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
Hi Alan, thank you for your reply i was a bit worried that i may offended you or any one else for that matter. I afraid due to health problems i dont get out much and i was given a few oppertunaties to join a couple of artist clubs and so on, but had to decline so i dont get to meet like minded people who are interested in painting, but joining this forum is a sort of life line to speak to artists, unfortunatly i tend to come over to much and may seem a bit over powering with my comments, I certainly dont wish to offend any one. I had two bad exsperiances with the last two boxes i bought, it was the actual last one that did it for me when i bought a heavy weight box that was described as well made, but within two months there was rust everware and it was,nt cheap, i took it back to the local art shop but just did not want to know, So i disided to sell other art materials and save up for a craig young paint box. I fully understand your choice of paint box, each of us paints in a differant manner so our choises of brushes ,paints and so on are gong to be differant, i would never critisze any else for what they use , it is better that we are all differant otherwise if we were painting would not be so enjoyable, I wish you all the best and enjoyment with what you do or use. the very best Harry.
By AmandaBrett - 11 Years Ago
Harry, I see from the other thread you have discovered Ted Wesson. It was discovering in 1994 the book on him by Ron Ranson that started me painting and I have the others by Susanne Haynes, Steve Hall and Barry Miles. I do not have My Corner of the Field. Steve Hall teaches in the Wesson style and I was fortunate to attend his course in east Sussex last month. Ted used the squirrel mops now available from Isabay or the like and I did until I discoverd the ProArte squirrel mops with a conventional ferrule. I prefer these because they seem to have just a little bit more snap. John Yardley, another lovely loose painter, likes Kolinsky sable. I found them to have too much snap and have plenty for sale. You will find in Ron Ranson's book that Ted Wesson had a metal folding palette very like the metal Holbein range which you know I favour and are used by Charles Evans and Gerald Green (look at his lovely loose work). Studying the techniques of these chaps is fascinating. You will see from My Gallery that I just can't achieve the impressionism of these marvellous artists.
Regards
Alan
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
Hi Alan, yes could say that i am hooked on this lovely loose style, i began by watching Alwyn Crawshaw many years ago and always sat down with my dinner just before work on the afternoon shift and became hooked on art as i had no exsperiance before and crertainly no idea how to paint, that was about 18 years ago. Now i just cannot stop, i have admired many other artists like Fletcher Watson and even the old masters like Monet and Constable, i can remember going to the National Art Gallery to see some of Monet,s work and of course Constable and could have sat there all day and studied his work. Since then i have so many books and tapes, DVD,s and am running out of room! i have to say until i bought steve hall,s DVD i new very little about ted wesson and i am now search for some his books and as i said i came across the one called My Corner of the Feild which is his biography i believe and was astonished at the price so he must have been very popular. What is the name of the book of his called that you have? would love to see some more of his work. By the way i read your other thread looking for the Artist,s mag,s, I have that many and will have a look through, you never know, if i have the ones you are looking for i will let you know. At the moment things are a bit hectic as we are having the bedroom dec- and are hopefuly going away for a couple of weeks so i might not get round to having a sort out when we ge back. All the best and keep at it sucsess could be just around the corner! { how do you get to your gallery page as i am new to this } many thanks Harry.
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
Hi Alan, just to say i found the gallery part and had a browse through your paintings and i think you should be proud of yourself! Your style very fresh and loose and brings out what watercolor is best at, the transparacy of the medium, i realy like the, i beleive is Venice and the Norfolk with the windmill, brings back fond memories when we used to go there on holiday, four years on the trot! I miss the place even more now i have caught the painting bug! if i could i would move there, but thats out of the question now. How i envy you going on a course to east sussex as well. By the way i have heard and seen charles evans but who is gerald green, is he new to painting or has he been around for a while? i dont useualy miss out on the big names in art especialy talking to craig young a lot as he goes on many courses and gives me the run down on who,s who in art, i remember him telling me about a well known artist who used to paint with W+N no7 sables and they only last him about six month,s as he worked them quite hard! I think you can ghess who i,m talking about? Well keep up the exellent work it is realy great and i,m not just saying that ! regards Harry.
By Artwayze - 11 Years Ago
Hi gazebo,

There's always 'flea-bay', for some of the more attractive of your boxes, if you don't use them.

For studio use with watercolour I use 5" diameter, ceramic rice bowls (white) and a selection of ramekins of the same colour. SAA also do small single dishes for watercolour. (like shallow ramekins.)  I use this method because I like to slosh the watercolour around and the rice bowls hold a lot of paint. More than enough to fill a No. 10 'mop'.

My travelling box at the moment is a plain W&N  box that I bought, full of colours about 20 years ago. It was £50.00 then!  I am going to try a wait for a Craig Young box myself; they have deep wells which is just what I like!

Good luck with disposing of your surplus palettes.

Regards
John
By Artwayze - 11 Years Ago
Monique,

We art buffs are collectors, each and everyone of us. We spend hours in art shops, buying stuff we probably won't use. One thing I have resisted though is a KopyKake! Not ready for that. Besides, I would need a generator to use it 'plein air' !!!
Regards
John
By Anonymous - 11 Years Ago
I have been watercolouring for sixty five years and I used to read wessons articles in the painters magazines .and I am a fan .I also like seago and it seemed wesson was a fan of his .. their paintings look very simillar
,i use the old heavy metal palettes and I paint inside with white enamel .when new ...the enamel i use / I used as a signwriter during my working life, I still have a stock I bought from Wrights of limm ,it is a very hard durable enamel ...talk about being a palette collector . I still have watercolour papers I bought forty years ago ... and notice the latest from saunders waterford seem a deeper cream. .can there be a little variance in processing ..has anyone noticed .cheers alan
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
Hi Alan, just got my second book on Edward Wesson and his work is realy growing on me, what a brilliant artist and appears sadly missed. Would have loved to have met him. Regards Harry.
By AmandaBrett - 11 Years Ago
Well done Harry. Is it Ron Ranson's which was the first and I think the best for colour reproduction? May be available in hardback from Amazon. I think the reprint was softcovers. Gerald Green has a web site and his book is published by David and Charles, "The Artists Essential Guide to Watercolour"
I coudn't find the windmill or Venice on my portfolio. Could be another Alan.Regards
Alan
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
HI Alan, I`m very sorry about the mix up with the gallery, i feel a right fool? well who ever it was it was posted by Alan i i was sure it was you. Will have to have another look through, what a start to this forum! seem to have messed up since i joined! Will go back to the begining and start again, Have been trying to find out a bit about Gerald Green but all i seem to come up is an illistrator of the same name but will keep looking. I see what you mean about the Holbein box asTed using one in the picture in the introduction of the book and can undefstand the principle of having plent of mixing area, just cant put the book down it`s so insparational, well sorry about the gallery and wish you well. Harry.
By Artwayze - 11 Years Ago

Heloo Harry,

I think the Gerald Green you found is the same painter. His work on jerramgallery.com looks very similar in style at least. Unless I am discomknockerated too!

All the best

John

By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
THAT SOUND`S PAINFUL ? :-( Harry
By Artwayze - 11 Years Ago

Well they can't touch us for it Harry! It's not illegal!!

Lol!

Cheers

John

By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
If you started with nothing and you still have most of it left , what happend to the other bit? (?) Harry .
By Artwayze - 11 Years Ago
Well Harry, either someone stole it, or I owe it to the Bank!

Lol!
Alla Best
John
By Rob - 11 Years Ago
Harry

Gerald Green's website is www.ggarts.demon.co.uk. Don't be misled by the illustrator bit as architectural perspectives were until recently his main source of work, but he has been working towards becoming sufficiently established to rely on full time painting instead. I have known Gerald for many years and I remember he would spend all his spare time sketching to develop the necessary skills - a lesson for us all! You can see even in his loosest paintings how his drafting has benefitted from his illustration work, which is accurately set up perspective to scale from plans and elevations.

He recommended to me an exercise involving describing with a line all the negative spaces around a subject - no shading. This is to bring home the importance to a composition of the negative spaces, and also to view solid shapes as abstract patterns.
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
What`s all this got to do with wattercolor pallets anyway? Are you with the Northan Rock, Any way i think you may be right about Gerald Green, must be the same one i have been looking at. I must look up Edward Seago heard a lot about him, it`s all a bit confusing as to who realy started this loose style of of watercolor.Some say it`s Wesson others say it was Seago? Would love to know, i know nothing? (lol) Harry.
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
Hi Rob, sorry but have just read your message, you must be right as that is what comes up every time i look it up, i was talking to a guy who was working in the frame shop i visit and he was an architec- and always remarked on how loose my paintings are and he found he just could`ent loosen up no matter what he tried, and put it down to his proffesion. I have heard of this a few times with other people in that profession and seem to find it a hard to cross over. I wonder if other painters who have had a technial back ground`s and have found it to be a stumbling block? Many thank,s Rob for the info. Harry.
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
Sorry Rob, ignore the silly message next to your`s ,but was chatting to someone else, some how got into the wrong section? Harry.
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
Hi John ,just sent you another message and it went to the wrong person? He must think i have lost the plot! :$ All the best buddy , and be careful out there! Cath you later, Harry. :-)
By Artwayze - 11 Years Ago
Hi there Harry,

You mentioned Seago and Wesson... They used a similar pallette I think.
Now we are back on pallettes, but I am talking about the colours themselves of course! Whatever I mix in though, it has to be white inside! I just had a free porcelain pallette with an order of 'size'.The 'gift' was half as big as it looked on the website! That's why I have half of nothing left. I keep spending.

I also have a lovely book on Seago (I think it's another of Ranson's books.) I like Seago's work too and I believe he was King George VI's favourite watercolourist; but I suppose the 'Grand-Master' of the loose impressionists in watercolour has to be Turner himself.

You could check out Trevor Chamberlain's watercolour work by the way. You'd like his style too I think.

Regards and happy painting.

John

By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
Hi, John, I was waiting for some one to go back as far as the Turner era- What about Constable? he did a lot very free oil sketches and watercolors. I renember watching a documentry on Monet, it was said that until he came to London and saw the work of both Turner and Constable that it realy hit him about the start of the impressionistic era ? Just makes you wonder hw far does it realy go back and can it realy be pinned down to one person or was it a gathering of different styles from a broader selection of differant artist`s ? Well my next target is to have a look at Seago, there is another book of Wesson`s My Corner of the Feild but i think thats out of my price range, having said that i do belive there is a new one out called The Master`s Choice. I think it is by Alwn Crawshaw About Wesson. I will look out for T. Chamberlin as well, all this reading , i`ll have no time for painting ! Any how must go. TTFN Harry.
By artyman - 11 Years Ago
I think painting tight or loose dpends very much on your personality and it used to worry me when I firt started painting and my style hadn't developed, now I don't worry and just paint as I feel happiest, trying to copy a loose or tight sytle is not the way to go just be yourself. Interesting about needing palettes to be white, one of the first things I usually try to do is cover the white paper so it is easier to judge tonal values, makes you wonder if having a mid grey palette would make the task easier, mine looks fairly messy most of th time anyway (lol)
By AngelaKingham - 11 Years Ago
Revisits an esoteric thread 'Watercolour Palettes', which out of curiosity I was following...collectors & users of containers for mixing water colours and their various merits...not my acrylic scene...but dear contributors you seem to have lost the thread not to mention the plot...
By Artwayze - 11 Years Ago

Isn't this what usually happens when people gather together to talk? When I was teaching, I used to try an exercise. I would write down a message; whisper it into a student's ear and then ask the students to pass on the message, in the same way, through the class. You would be surprised what the end message could be after about 20 students had 'passed it on'! 

Doesn't this, dear Meltemi,  show we are human, occasionally inattentive  and not locked into our art, to the exclusion of all else?

Regards

John

By AngelaKingham - 11 Years Ago
No. I retired after 25 years of lecturing in biological sciences...to read esoterica of watercolour palettes...
By Artwayze - 11 Years Ago
Hi Meltemi,

I'm sorry if you took my post the wrong way.

I was merely trying to point out that the thread had wandered away from palettes, just as 'real' conversations wander, given the human element. And that it didn't matter all that much. Communications get snarled up, in the same way, but there's nothing esoteric about that happenstance! Hence my regular 'charade' in the lecture room. So my apologies if lines got crossed.

To return to palettes: I have two porcelain palettes, with six wells and mixing flats, a W&N sketch-box, a couple of plastic deep-well palettes and a free ceramic palette from an online store. It has seven tiny wells that would just about take a tube of water colour! So I think I'll use it like that.

I use Chinese rice-bowls for mixing watercolour in the studio and I have half a dozen. I just ordered a new sketch box with four, nice deep wells. You can guess I like deep wells to mix watercolour! I shall have to wait for the new one until Jan '09. I expect this thread might have exhausted itself by then. ( I can't put a smiley face, because I can't find the blessed things!)

All the best Mel.

Regards

John
By AmandaBrett - 11 Years Ago
OK all. I am sorry for starting this thread. Mea culpa. But keep it going.
Alan
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
Hi, there is a lot of sense in what you say, since i started painting some years back i always renemeber reading art books or watching art video`s that it`s best to paint and draw as much as you can and let your own natural style come through. But having said that many of us has one one or two artist1s that we aspire to and of course can in some ways influence us in one form or another, i think it`s just a natural prgression as many of the past masters would have probaly done. It`s how we adapt those idea`s and take them to another level or a slightly differant way of seeing what`s in front of us. I must admit i do like to look up differant artist`s and see if i can gain anthing from them that might assist me in the way i paint, we all need to learn from each other as painting is continial learning prosses and i think that is what is so fasinating about painting you are always learning. Best wishes Harry.
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
By the way that was a reply to Artyman. Harry.
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
HARRY - 2008-09-03 7:24 PM

By the way that was a reply to Artyman. Harry.
Has any one found a plot, seem`s to be one missing?
By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
Hi Gazebo 1, how are you getting on with your new Holbein pallete box, just bought the book by ron ranson about E. Wesson and notised the photo of ted with a simular looking box, the one you bought is the largest , do you find it difficult to hold, it`s just it look`s realy large? Most certainly plenty of mixing space. Do apoligise for not renmembering your first name , so many new members joining it`s hard to keep up? all the best Harry. If you dont hear from me after Saturday shall be away for two week`s. :-S
By artyman - 11 Years Ago
My palettes are a much loved battered Reeves student metal jobby circa 1950 something and a modern folding plastic. I buy tubes and fill the pans in the Reeves one and the other is more conventional in layout. I have others but they are gathering dust somewhere. For Acrylics I use a stay wet.
By Artwayze - 11 Years Ago
Hi there Harry,

I notice you are away for a couple of weeks. Hope it's somewhere nice and that you get plenty of painting in. Just have a good time and bring back something to put up in the gallery.

For artyman:
As for palletes it doesn't matter what I use. None of them will make me paint any better or worse. However, I have noticed since I bought a big mop, I do need to mix more colour to fill the brush. So I need something with deep wells.

In the studio, I use porcelain bowls and small saucers. But I can't take those into the field very easily. So I decided I'd buy yet another sketch box, with deep mixing wells.

For anyone interested, John Lewis market a nice range of Rice Bowls in various sizes. I got enough for my needs for £20.00. post free. Considering that my old porcelain palettes were not much less and have tiny wells, I reckon the rice bowls are good value. In fact the 9cm bowls look as if they were designed as palettes!

For the John Tookey and Hazel Soan fans, they have both made interesting new DVD's for Townhousefilms. There are trailers available if you Google Townhousefilms.

Now can anyone please tell me how I insert smilies? I shan't go mad with them, but they do help illustrate tone of voice.

Happy Painting folks.
John



By HARRY - 11 Years Ago
Hi John, thank!s we had a reasonable time but would have been nicer if the weather was a bit kinder, we went to Freshwater East and had the top chalet over loking the bay, we try to go there a lot but stop in differant part!s of Pembrokeshire. It!s a beautiful area, I only took a couple of sketch pad!s and a small Holbein pallete just to do some sketches so i can bring back to work from at home. The one night i did four small paintings in approx one and a half hour!s just as a loosing up exorsize, but i cheated a bit and used my travel hair dryer ? Next year we have re-booked the same place but this time i!m going to take half impear size paper and what i class as studio gear, so it will be one of Craig!s box!s. Wished i!d taken it this time but as useual we ended taking far to much of the useual luggsge i had to comrimise? By the way i do have some cramic palletes that might interest you with deep mixing area!s, one is very large, ideal for studio work. All the best john ,will catch up later? Harry
By Frazer Price - 8 Years Ago
I have recently read the group's comments on palette boxes and mention was made of the Frazer Price Palette Box - probably time that I enter the forum as I am Frazer Price.I designed and had the box manufactured, in Shropshire, and first came on sale in 1985 and continued to be marketed until the early '90s.
The box came into being because of my frustration with what was available for the travelling watercolourist.I was a publisher and whilst I was travelling extensively for Newsweek I would find time to sketch in one country before spending endless hours on my way to the next port of call and decided my time could be usefully spent by painting on theplane. I had a Gabbi box which was Ok but with only a curtain ring as a holding device it was uncomfortable. Therefore,over time, I designed a lacquered brass bijou type box just over 4 " long under 3" wide and 2" deep.The inside pieces were made from washable plastic with room for 18 half pans or with slides for paint from tubes,a water bottle and a divided reservoir for clean and dirty water. Two fold out enamel mixing trays one with a thumb hole enabling the box to be held comfortably as as a palette. It was launched in the Leisure Painter in 1985 and the advertisements had an endorsement by Rowland Hilder-the only time the great man endorsed anything- the selling price was £28.95 and with a couple of price increases it was marketed until '93/4 selling over 5000 boxes worldwide. It was also branded and marketed by Talens and Daniel Smith in the States.
A point of interest when the box was first produced- the prototype costing£1,400.-I offered it to Windsor and Newton who initially showed great interest but then pulled out as they considered the box to 'glamorous' but asked if I would mind if they produced a plastic box based loosely on the FP box. I had no desire to go into mass production - hence the Cotman box arrived on the scene.
If any of you have archive copies of Leisure Painter you might read an excellent critique by Ray Campbell Smith in the December '85 issue.
All that's left now are a dozen boxes for the grandchildren and posterity. All my painting comes from the Frazer Price Palette Box and if you have the time click onto www.frazerprice.shutterfly .com and you'll see it at work!
I hope this answers some queries and thank you for getting to this far.
By Administrator - 8 Years Ago
The link to see Frazer Prices' images is http://frazerprice.shutterfly.com/
Worth a look!